Gynecologic MIS

Below is a limited listing of the most common minimally invasive procedures performed at St. Dominic’s. To find out more, call 601-200-8000.

A hysterectomy removes a women’s uterus, or womb. During a hysterectomy, other parts of a woman’s reproductive system, such as the cervix, ovaries, and fallopian tubes, might also be removed. After a hysterectomy, a woman is no longer able to bear children.

A hysterectomy might be done for several reasons:

  • Fibroids in the uterus
  • Endometriosis
  • Pelvic support problems
  • Abnormal bleeding
  • Chronic pain
  • Gynecologic cancer

At St. Dominic’s, most hysterectomies are done with minimally invasive surgery. The type of minimally invasive surgery used is called robotic laparoscopy.

  • In laparoscopic surgery, your doctor makes A SINGLE? ONE OR TWO? small incision(S) at the site of the procedure. A small lighted camera called a laparoscope and other instruments are inserted through the opening(S).
  • Your doctor moves the surgical equipment using robotic arms from a computer near the operating table.

The advantages of laparoscopic surgery generally are less blood loss and pain during the surgery and a better appearance. Typically, you will have the surgery as an outpatient and go home the same day.

A robotic laparoscopic surgery generally takes longer than a traditional procedure and may be difficult for someone who is very thin or very large.

As with all surgery, there is a risk of infection or pain after surgery. Your doctor will describe how to take care of yourself after the procedure so that you heal as quickly as possible.

Leaking urine involuntarily is called incontinence. It is more common in women than men, and the chance of incontinence increases with age.

Stress urinary incontinence is one of the types of incontinence that can be treated with surgery. This type of incontinence can happen when the muscles supporting the bladder and urethra begin to weaken and sag. Surgery to correct the problem falls into two main categories:

  • Sling procedures
  • Colposuspension

Two options are available for these surgeries. Traditional, or open, surgery, involves a single incision. Minimally invasive surgery, by comparison, uses several small incisions. In laparoscopic surgery, a small lighted camera called a laparoscope and other instruments are inserted through the openings.

In a laparoscopic sling procedure, the doctor typically makes a small incision in the lower part of the abdomen and another one in the vagina. A sling is inserted passed under the urethra and neck of the bladder. The ends of the sling are tacked to muscles in the abdomen to relieve pressure on the urethra and bladder.

The sling might be made of human or animal tissue, or synthetic material.

In a laparoscopic colposuspension procedure, the doctor makes a small cut in the abdomen.

Through this incision, the doctor attaches the neck of the bladder, part of the wall of the vagina, and the urethra to adjacent bones and ligaments. This process also relieves the pressure on your urethra and bladder.

As with all surgery, there is a risk of infection or pain after surgery. Your doctor will describe how to take care of yourself after the procedure so that you heal as quickly as possible.